Monthly Archives: January 2017

“First they came….”

FIRST THEY CAME

"First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Socialist. Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Trade Unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me." -- Pastor Martin Niemöller (1892–1984)

Short Story: GRANDPA

This is the first short story in my collection 14 DARK WINDOWS. You can get it in its entirety if you download the free sample for Kindle, but I thought that maybe some people who don't do Amazon or have a Kindle might want to read it.  I wrote it a long time ago as a contest entry where the first sentence and six additional words were given and you constructed a story around them.  Enjoy!

GRANDPA

“All the King’s Horses, and all the King’s men, couldn’t put Humpty together again!” Grandpa finished the rhyme and closed the book. “Well, Billy, what else would you like to do?” Billy loved his grandfather. Grandpa always had time for a story, a game, or to simply talk. “I’ll do whatever you want to do, Grandpa.” * * * * * You can read the rest of this story by clicking this link or by going to "Stories" on the menu above and choosing "Grandpa." You can buy 14 DARK WINDOWS at Amazon by clicking this link:  14 DARK WINDOWS * * * * *

Superheroes in Thriller Fiction

A few years back, I read three books in a row that sort of opened my eyes to the use of some sort of super human in crime/thriller fiction. The first was Greg Iles' The Devil's Punchbowl, the second was Robert Crais' The First Rule, and the third was C.J. Box's Cold Wind. Let me throw in Harlan Coben's Myron Bolitar series with this bunch. It struck me as I read, that each hero/protagonist was aided by someone with almost superhuman abilities. In the three mentioned books all of them were Special Forces types. Iles' main character is attorney Penn Cage, and I love his Natchez southern settings. In this book, however, Cage is up against really really bad guys involved with a floating casino, and he calls a guy to help out - an ex-Seal named Daniel Kelly. Kelly and his guys are so good it's scary in itself. You're certainly glad they're on your side. In the second book, Crais steps away from Elvis Cole, his usual protagonist, to allow Cole's sidekick, Joe Pike, to move front and center. Pike is another Special Forces type, though I'm not sure about what branch. Totally confident and as tough as nails. And he's got those Special Forces skills that make him seem invincible. In the third book, CJ Box's protagonist is a rather normal game warden named Joe Pickett. But Joe is friends with a guy named Nate Romanowski, who is wanted by the government. Nate is another scary-good ex-Special Forces type whose plans always seem to work out. I threw in Bolitar's name because he has his buddy Win Lockhorn, the prissy rich guy who (along with Myron) has some sort of Special Forces training and who also always seems to know he's going to win. Fortunately for the good guys, he always has, so far. Some of the other thriller series feature guys who are scary good at what they do, like Jack Reacher of the Lee Child series, or Lincoln Rhyme, the quadraplegic genius of Jeffrey Deaver's books. About the only guy who is really good but isn't exactly a superhuman is Harry Bosch. But he's close. Just some stuff that crossed my mind as I knocked out those three books.  Does one "need" a superhero, invincible-type character in order to make things work in these sorts of thrillers?  If you can think of other examples, please post them in the comments. *****