Tag Archives: ebooks

Steven M. Moore’s REMBRANDT’S ANGEL is out!

Just a quick hit to let anyone reading this know that Rembrandt's Angel by Steven M. Moore is out and available from Penmore Press.

I had the pleasure of reading this before it was published and can attest that it's an excellent read.  Great characters and a tense situation with a broad plot that runs the principals all over Europe and the British Isles.

It's available in trade paperback and as a Kindle e-book...

Here's the link to the Kindle e-book:  Rembrandt's Angel

Happy reading!

*****

Short Story: GRANDPA

This is the first short story in my collection 14 DARK WINDOWS. You can get it in its entirety if you download the free sample for Kindle, but I thought that maybe some people who don't do Amazon or have a Kindle might want to read it.  I wrote it a long time ago as a contest entry where the first sentence and six additional words were given and you constructed a story around them.  Enjoy!

GRANDPA

“All the King’s Horses, and all the King’s men, couldn’t put Humpty together again!” Grandpa finished the rhyme and closed the book. “Well, Billy, what else would you like to do?” Billy loved his grandfather. Grandpa always had time for a story, a game, or to simply talk. “I’ll do whatever you want to do, Grandpa.” * * * * * You can read the rest of this story by clicking this link or by going to "Stories" on the menu above and choosing "Grandpa." You can buy 14 DARK WINDOWS at Amazon by clicking this link:  14 DARK WINDOWS * * * * *

Publishing Paralysis

As you may or may not have noticed, I have not published anything...ANYTHING...in 2016.  It's not for a lack of things to publish.  I currently have four works ready to go.  They are, in no particular order, ODD MAN OUT, RECIPROCAL EVIL, THE NEVER ENDING NIGHT, and finally, DEAD OR ALIVE.  Most are novella-length; RECIPROCAL EVIL is a bit over 50,000 words, while ODD MAN OUT clocks in at about 33,000.  I think that both DEAD OR ALIVE and THE NEVER ENDING NIGHT are around the same length:  approximately 27,000 words. I have been writing.  I have a YA novel finished called THE SEVEN CITIES OF GOLD:  CIBOLA which is about 53,000 words.  I am about 68,000 words into an untitled end-of-the-world novel which was inspired by Hugh Howey's WOOL.  I'm working on a longer vampire novel which would follow DEAD OR ALIVE and a horror story set in a fictional town called Addison Falls.  I've also been tinkering with a series that I started with my son a couple years ago, called THE NINE KEYS.  The first of that series is basically finished, and it is something around 68,000 to 70,000 words in length.  The second is about 20,000 words at this point and has a long way to go.  I also started a space opera novel but that's stalled out at around 17,000 words at the moment. Covers are done for three of the four ready-to-go works, editing and formatting are done for all four.  So what's the holdup, you might ask (assuming that "you" are reading this and are interested in reading what I'm writing)? I haven't been selling much (okay, I really haven't been selling anything!) and I need to do something different.  One option is to give up.  Or keep doing what I've been doing, which involves tossing up my writing, offering it for sale, and having no one actually find any of it. The second option is to try to form a better foundation.  So far I have only published ebooks and only at Amazon.  So, my foundation is this blog/website, my Amazon author page, and my Facebook page.  I have, like, 64 followers on Facebook.  Not enough.  And depending on Facebook to get the word out is a crapshoot.  When I look at how many people view my posts on my Scott Dyson page there, often it's like 7, or 13, or at best low 20's.  So of those 64 people, only a small percentage even SEE my notifications when I publish.  Without paying FB to show the post to more people, I guess that's about the best one can do there. I am thinking of doing Instagram, just for my cover photos.  I have thought about taking down my collections and publishing the individual works for free on Wattpad, but after looking around there, I didn't have much luck finding a lot of stuff I wanted to read.  I went specifically looking for my friend Steve Moore's work there, and I didn't find it with their search functions.  So I wonder how effective that will be for what I write. I try to "network" with other writers as much as possible.  I will promote authors' works (assuming they are something I like and read) here on these pages, with FB posts, and in any other way that comes up, and I have a few author-friends who have helped me out as well.  But I don't think our audiences cross over very much, or at least what I write is not necessarily of interest to their audiences.  I read so broadly and across so many genres that I am happy to promote their stuff; even more, I WANT to suggest and recommend good reads to my friends.  I think that maybe if I could network with some horror authors, it would work better.  I have tried with a couple, but they don't seem interested in reciprocating. But the biggest thing I want to do is set up a mailing list.  And I don't really know how to go about it.  I mean, signing up is easy.  And it seems that putting the widget on the website is not a big challenge either.  But most authors I've spoken to who use mailing lists effectively offer a free work, and all I have are mobi's of my works.  I'd certainly be willing to offer one or both of my short story collections, or even one of my novellas, for free as an incentive to sign up for the list, but as I have not used any of the software (Vellum, Sigil, Calibre) that apparently can generate ebooks in various formats, I don't know how to get these files to give away. As a mailing list builds, eventually you have a ready-made list of people who are interested in receiving information about your releases, and maybe, just maybe, you can sell enough books upon release to push your work into some sort of visibility on Amazon.    I think that this sounds like the best way to increasing sales and visibility. I also plan on giving away both of my short story collections (as they're both in Amazon Kindle Select and in KU) and I want to try a FB experiment, ask some friends if they'd share the links to the free books, see if I can give away a bunch more than I usually do.  Watch this page for announcements about those giveaways, or if you're a Facebook friend, watch my feeds there. Anyway, I'm going to try to break the paralysis in the next month or two, and get this stuff out there for anyone and everyone to read.  If anyone is interested, that is... ***  

ODD MAN OUT – Prologue

(I have three new stories ready to go; I'm just dragging my feet on publishing them because I want to get a few other things in place before I start running them out there.  One is a long version of my short story "Odd Man Out," which was published as a standalone (with another short story called "The House at the Bend in the Road") and as part of the collection 14 DARK WINDOWS.  What follows is the Prologue of that story, which is novella-length (about 33,000 words, if I recall correctly).  Watch this space or sign up for my soon-to-come mailing list to find out when it is available on Amazon.

ODD MAN OUT

Prologue

Roger Sinclair checked the calendar that hung on the wall over his computer. October nineteenth. Only the nineteenth. It seemed that the thirty-first was taking forever to arrive this year. Time was dragging. Anticipation had a way of making the passage of time seem very slow. The Cabin Weekend was approaching, and Roger had big plans for the traditional yearly gathering of his friends. Friends. That was a laugh. They didn't like him any more than he liked them. They used him. They always had. Vinnie, Jack and Paul – they hung around with him – no, they let him hang around with them – because he was smart, dependable, and well-off. He made them feel superior – Look at rich, smart, loser Roger, who can't get a girl and gets shunned by everyone...but us! We'll take pity on the loser, and we'll take advantage of his brains and his wealth. Like the Cabin Weekend. They always went to Roger's cabin. None of them had cabins. And why spend money on a real vacation when they could just sponge off Roger? Vinnie and Susan, Jack and Nancy, and Paul and whatever hot-looking hosebag he was dating at the moment. Well, not this year. Paul wasn't dating a hot-looking hosebag anymore. He was engaged. To Amy Wellington. Amy might be hot, but she was no hosebag. She was the epitome of class. She was the girl of Paul's dreams, as Paul himself had pointed out. She was also the girl of Roger's dreams, but that was beside the point. Paul never cared about what Roger wanted, only what he wanted. He wanted Amy, so of course he ended up with her. That's how it worked with Paul. No matter that he had been Roger's guest at a charity function when he met Amy. Paul had deigned to accompany Roger to the event when Roger's own date fell through. 'Fell through' is sort of misleading. She dumped me on my ass, he remembered. Bitch. Focus! Roger forced himself to get back on track with his thoughts. This wasn't about Melissa, the stick-up-her-ass bitch that worked in the IT department of Roger's family's company. The point was Paul, and how he met Amy, and how he had practically run Roger over in his zeal to get to her first. Paul knew that Roger saw her first, that Roger wanted to take a shot with her, but could Paul let him have a chance? No, of course he couldn't. What Paul wants, Paul gets. Roger's fantasy was that Amy would see Paul for what he was and eventually they'd split up. It would be Paul's fault, of course, and Roger would be there for Amy. He'd be the understanding friend she would need, the shoulder she could cry on, the guy who'd be there for her as she worked through the pain of their broken engagement. Of course it would end Paul's friendship with Roger, but that was okay. It wasn't a real friendship, and it had not been one for a long time. Ever since that day at the frat party back in college... Focus! he told himself again. This isn't about embarrassment that Paul caused him in college, this is about Amy Wellington. Paul's fiancee. Roger's one true love. And the Cabin Weekend would be the time when things would turn in favor of Roger.

#

(To find out what happens at the Cabin Weekend, watch for ODD MAN OUT at Amazon or on these pages...)

Books, books and more books…

Whoa, it's been almost a month since I posted anything here. I've been writing a little, trying to get my ducks in a row for some sort of concerted effort to release four novellas/novels within a short time.  Working on my post-apocalyptic novel, which is part The Stand and part Wool.  (There are three ways to survive this apocalypse.  1.  Build a shelter.  2.  Be immune to this virus.  3.  Be invited.)    Reworking blurbs for those three novellas and one novel. But I've been reading. A short time ago, I posted that I'd read, and was impressed with, Ernest Cline's debut novel, Ready Player One.    I finished his second novel, a mashup of alien movie themes and stories, titled Armada.    I enjoyed it, not quite as much as the debut, but it was still a lot of fun.  Aliens are coming to destroy us, but we've known about it for the last forty years and have been preparing for the invasion.  And guess what?  We train our drone pilots by having them play video games.  Does that sound familiar?  Maybe something like The Last Starfighter?  It borrows, or pays homage, to that film along with 2001: A Space Odyssey and Contact and others.  It kept me (and my son) reading once we got into it. I also picked up another book, one I've had sitting on the bookshelves since before Borders closed its doors (it still had the Borders sticker on it) called WWW: Wake by Robert J. Sawyer.  I've always enjoyed Sawyer's works, and this one ended up being really good.  A blind girl with a very specific and rare type of blindness gets an implant which allows the visual signals to be altered and transmitted through the optic nerve, and it also allows her to "see" the World Wide Web.  Through her enhanced awareness of the Web, she becomes aware of something - some entity - lurking in the background of that network, and whatever it is, it's learning and becoming more aware of itself.  Interesting premise, well-executed, with good characters and a setup for future books.  I may read in in the three book series at some point. My ebook reading included Fatally Bound by Roger Stelljes, a thriller featuring a couple of too-good-to-be-true sleuths/agents.  I liked it, and it worked on a number of levels as they work the investigation alongside an FBI task force to locate a serial killer who is targeting various women who seem to have no common features or connections between them.  Also I read another installment in Boyd Craven's The World Burns serial, this the seventh story, titled The World Cowers.  I have come to know and care about his characters and I want to find out where he's ultimately going with the tale.  Also finished Sleep Tight by Anne Frasier, another serial killer thriller, and also a pretty good read.  And I read Edward W. Robertson's third Rebel Stars book, titled Ronin.   Enjoyed it quite a bit.  Good space opera. There are others, but that's a good summary of some of the books I've been reading. *****

Steven M. Moore titles on sale

Under "Books I Enjoyed that won't set you back much..." Steven M. Moore has two of his books (the Mary Jo Melendez books) on sale through this weekend,  only via Smashwords.  From his website:
Last weekend! The “Mary Jo Melendez Mysteries” are on sale. Mary Jo is inviting you to celebrate with her for leaving Amazon exclusivity and appearing on Smashwords too. She’s an ex-USN Master-at-Arms who manages to get into a lot of trouble as a civilian; she also manages to beat the odds and survive, though. Muddlin’ Through (Smashwords coupon code KY27A) is an international thriller where she works to clear her name and pay back the group that framed her. In the process, she discovers the MECHs, Mechanically Enhanced Cybernetic Humans, and romance as she runs around the U.S., South American, and Europe. Silicon Slummin’…and Just Gettin’ By (Smashwords coupon code VT64E) takes place almost exclusively in the Silicon Valley where she has two government groups pursuing her, one U.S., the other Russian. She also has a stalker on a revenge mission. Both books, normally $2.99, are $0.99 on Smashwords, using the coupon codes, until August 1—lots of entertaining summer reading for $2!
I've read them and I enjoyed both.  If you're looking for a couple of good reads for $1.98, give them a look-see. ****

New (to me) Thrillers!

I recently found two authors who I decided to try, and found that I enjoyed their works.  I'll be reading more of both. Steve Richer is one.  I read his TERROR BOUNTY and enjoyed it quite a bit.  Here's my Amazon review:
This was my first exposure to the thrillers of Steve Richer, and I'm gonna be going back for more! It was a fast-paced trip through the world of international terrorism and intrigue, and I had trouble putting it down. I loved the main characters (Rick and Olivia) and even though the idea that an amateur could just waltz into this world and accomplish what needed to be accomplished, in the end, I bought into it because it was such a fun story. I'll be trying more of Richer's works.
I enjoyed reading about the terrorist's ideas on the state of the world, which are juxtaposed with his murderous actions.  Nothing is black and white, in the book, or in the world... Here's the link to see it on Amazon:  TERROR BOUNTY by Steve Richer. Another author is M.P. McDonald.  She uses a supernatural or magical device (a camera that takes pictures of future tragedies somehow) to allow her main characters to get into position to be involved with crimes and/or terrorism.  I've read three of McDonald's books so far and enjoyed all of them.  Here's my Amazon review of one of them:
I really enjoyed this thriller, which hinges on the unlikely existence of a camera that shows the future. There were great characters, tense situations, and a nice resolution. I've already read its sequel, CAPTURE, and will review that at some point in the future.
Short but to the point.   McDonald has written a series of five other books about Mark Taylor, the original owner of the camera.  I've read one of those, the first-in-series NO GOOD DEEDS, and enjoyed it quite a bit.  The two CJ Sheridan books were a lot of fun and quite tense at times. Here's the link to see SHOOT on Amazon:  SHOOT by M.P. McDonald. Some very good, new-to-me- reads. *****

Independent Fiction

I was looking at the books I've downloaded on my Kindle and they are probably 95% by indie authors.  That's pretty amazing, really, considering that a few years ago I didn't know anything about the field. I remember how I started downloading books by indie authors.  The first one I did was a book called BONE SHOP by Tim "TA" Pratt.  It is an urban fantasy, the fifth book in a series that had previously been published by a BPH imprint but was dropped after the fourth book.  Why, I don't exactly know.  Was it not selling?  I bought the first four at Barnes and Noble bookstores, where they had exactly one copy on the shelf.  I always looked when I'd go back in to see if they had anything else by Pratt, and once I bought the single copy of whichever they had, well, that was it. I was following a blog of editor Annetta Ribken on Journalscape back in the day, before she was an editor.  She had a very entertaining blog, and she was working on a novel, which was released as ATHENA'S PROMISE.  She decided to release it indie via Kindle and Createspace, and I bought the ebook of that one as well.  Both of those ebooks costed $4.99, which, at the time, I considered a bargain.  Now I consider it a premium that I'm willing to pay for authors I like.  Even then, I think twice about it.  "Just how much do I want to read this book right now?" I started thinking that if Annetta could do it that way, so could I.  Another author-friend who I met at Chicago's Printer's Row Festival, Sean Hayden, was working with a small press, editing and writing his own fiction.  He and his significant other, Jen Wylie, opened their own small press called Untold Press, and began publishing their own fiction as well as a few other authors.  Yeah, it's technically a small press, but it started as a way of indie publishing their own works. Connecting the dots, I found the blogs of Dean Wesley Smith and J.A. Konrath, and then I found Hugh Howey.  WOOL was, for me, a revelation.  It was engrossing -- I couldn't hardly put it down when I purchased it as an ebook.  Howey's story was almost as engrossing.  He put the book out in shorter installments, five of them, at $0.99 each, then compiled them into the single edition at $4.99.  And Hugh was making a killing financially, or so it seems. I found "The Passive Voice" and answered a submissions call for a SF anthology called QUANTUM ZOO, and lo and behold, mine was one of the twelve stories accepted for publication in the volume.  If nothing else, it validated me in my own eyes as a writer. From Konrath's blog, I read a comment by author Steven M. Moore, and somehow realized that he wrote SF and thrillers, and I followed the link to his blog, and now I've read everything he's written save (I think) two books.  (I'll correct that oversight this year.)  I also found horror novels by Bryan Smith and by William Malmborg, which led me again to other horror novelists. Now I'm reading one indie work after another, generally.  (I am trying to get a good run into Robert Crais' third Joe Pike novel, called THE SENTRY, but haven't found the time to get into it much.)  I am in the midst of a series (starting with E) by Kate Wrath.  I'm reading Mit Sandru's novels.  I read Sean Platt, Johnny B. Truant, John Ellsworth, Bobby Adair, and Edward W. Robertson. I've found tons of the fiction I want to read, and I haven't broken the bank buying all these books. Not to mention, I've become an indie author myself, with a bunch of short stories and collections out as well as two novellas. Buy indie.  Cut out that middle man! *****  

THE HURRICANE by Hugh Howey – my mini-review

I wanted to post this review of Howey's THE HURRICANE, which I ended up enjoying quite a bit.  It wasn't perfect, but...well, you can read my review, copied from Amazon... I wasn't sure what to expect from this book, and at first, I was a little disappointed, because it took the story a little bit of time to grab me and pull me in. It seemed that a lot of pages were dedicated to showing me what a non-descript high school kid Daniel was. But I knew it was a Hugh Howey story, and so I kept reading. Finally, as the storm hit, the story kicked in, and when Daniel meets a neighbor girl who he previously didn't even know existed, we are treated to the real Daniel...the kid being hidden by all the BS that is high school social interaction. And from there the story became (for me) a compelling read, demanding that I continue until I reached the end. At first, because I hadn't been grabbed by the story, I was noticing the simplicity of the writing. After finishing a Stephen King novel (REVIVAL) before starting this one, I missed the masterful command of language that I believe King has. There was a lack of elegance and beauty in the words and phrases used to convey the story. I started to wonder if, because of the great plots of other Howey offerings, I'd missed this about his writing. And I still don't know, because when the story grabbed me, it grabbed me, and if that lack of elegance was still there, I didn't notice it. (I suspect it was, and I just was beyond paying attention to it.) For me, the mark of a really good story is that I want to know what happens to these characters down the road. Howey made me care about them, and that is a success in my book. *****

THE INN is live!

I finally did it!  THE INN, my 37,000 word horror/suspense/thriller, is live on Amazon! Take a look at the cover: The Inn Cover 4 Here's the blurb from Amazon:
BAND TRIP TO PERIL... The Jackson High School Band and student director Kimberly Bouton are making their biennial journey to a music festival in the deep South for fun and educational opportunities. Kim expects to deal with hormonal teenagers, a severe lack of sleep, and long boring bus rides, but the roadside inn where the band stays on their visit hides a sinister secret – and it translates to unimagined horrors for students and teachers alike... Check into THE INN, where the guests are the entertainment...
It's not for everyone.  It's horror (nothing extreme, but people die and such, like in most horror), and it's the realistic type of horror, not the supernatural type.  But please take a look if you are so inclined. !!!!! *****